’72 Trashcan Sleeper Bomb

1972 Chevy Nova "The Trash Can"

1972 Chevy Nova “The Trash Can”

It’s been far too long since I posted a good old sleeper car, so I’ll make up for it by posting an absolute monster of a car.

Brilliantly and aptly named, “The Trash Can” is a 1972 Chevy Nova with a little more than just rust and worn seats under her belt. This classic muscle car boasts a 5.3-L V8 heart, and helping this old-timer breath a little better, twin Precision 58mm turbos turn this tired old dog into a purebred greyhound.

Sinister looking Chevy Nova "The Trash Can"

Sinister looking Chevy Nova “The Trash Can”

Gargling Gas loves sheep in wolf’s clothing cars so much, we have a sister page dedicated to Sleeper Cars on G+, so if you think “The Trash Can” is right up your alley, check us out and show us your sleepers.

The beauty about this particular sleeper is it covers all the bases when it comes to Gargling Gas’ depiction of the perfect car: Badass, Sinister, Fast, Loud and full of character… after all, cars having feelings too, right?

Twin Turbo Sleeper Car

Twin Turbo Sleeper Car

This is “The Trash Can” trying to destroy a dyno, and whilst I couldn’t find legit BHP figures, the fact she can hit the 1/4 mile in the 9s suggests 800+

The coolest part about “The Trash Can” isn’t just her badass looks and power; it’s the fact she only cost $4K.

Check her out showing off on the strip in the video below.

NOTE: These were test runs, and the fact she left the lights way after the car in the opposite lane was so her crew could listen to the engine etc…

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Don’t Wake The Sleeping Wagons

sleeper

Gargling Gas adores the wagon/estate cars and gets all excited and squirmy over sleepers – because these two trends have been red hot for a few years now, you only have to take a short trip from your front door to stumble across a project or two.

I stumbled across an Audi estate today, the reason for this post and also to touch on a prospect wagon/sleeper build I’ve been thinking of taking on since I saw an old twin-turbo Mitsubishi for sale at the side of a road for peanuts. The Audi wasn’t anything special, a late 90s silver estate, sitting slightly low. I wasn’t sure if the suspension was worn or the owner intended the slight drop, but judging by the reconditioned and freshly painted rims, I guess the former. Simply adding dark metallic grey rims to a retro estate suddenly gave it bags of character and instantly erased any preconceptions about “family runs”, “another baby on the way” and practicality.

Over the past few years, Wagons have gained popularity, partly thanks to the Hipster trend and their penchant for 80s euro estates like the Volvos and BMWs, and partly (I think) because the boxy and retro cars are fast becoming the cool ride to customise. Whether it’s a Volvo drift missile, a GM dragster, or even a Japanese sleeper, the need for angles and sharp lines, simplicity and easy tuning means anyone can stamp their mark on a cool car without breaking the bank.

Despite its spike in popularity, compared to the much sought after 80s Jap hot-hatch turbos such as the Honda City Turbo, the Nissan March (turbo and supercharged) and the Toyota GTI-R Pulsar, the wagon is still a cheaper option. Same goes if you were to compare the wagon to the Nissan Silvia, predominately the S13, as it’s the ultimate choice for drift builds and fast becoming hard to find unmolested and in manual.

However, there were a few desirable wagons before the likes of the AMGs and the Ms took over, cars built for the family man refusing to compromise on power. The BMW 325i Touring (below) and the Audi RS2 Avant (above) are great examples of German engineering, cars designed to transport family and furniture comfortably and at speed – solid examples are few and far between.

The great thing about the retro Wagon is you’re bring something different to the table, its versatility shrugging off any of the labels that automatically come with the hot hatch and drift missile. The fact they mostly come as RWD means they can be adapted for drifting; if you require the stealthy sheep-in-wolf’s-clothing mobile, the wagon is the master of deception, especially if it has a roof rack.

Back to the Mitsubishi. If I remember correctly, it was the twin-turbo Galant VR4 Estate with tinted glass, after-market rims and bonnet vents, very much like the picture above. The thing was dusty but looked menacing, as though abandoned. It’s twin-turbo 2.5-L V6  had covered 89,000 miles and it was up for £2750, but I already had a WRX wagon I was having fun in at the time.

The VR4 produces 280-bhp, and with some tuning and light modification, it could pump out 320-bhp, something easily obtainable with a twin-turbo V6. The one I saw for sale wasn’t exactly a sleeper because it suggested power and menace, but imagine sourcing a clean example with original rims and a ventless bonnet. Picture it, having had a full engine service, a slight boost increase and a re-map, up on a dyno, the readout topping 320-bhp. You could get away with stripping out the interior because tinted rear glass isn’t uncommon with estates. You’d be left with a considerably lighter, 320+bhp twin-turbo family wagon, an ostensibly unthreatening car… until you cut it up on the motorway.

For a third of the price of decent Nissan S13 or a rare Jap hot-hatch turbo you can pick up a car with so much tuning potential and areas of weight reduction, it will come an obsession until you finally hit its sweet spot and see your reflection grinning back at you in the rearview as you glide past a 911 turbo.

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ZZZ ZZZ Sleeper

What you see above isn’t quite what you’d expect. Okay, so it’s obviously a sleeper build (the title and reg plate also give it away), and you’d be right in thinking this ordinary 80s Ford possesses a little extra grunt. Now take a closer look at the Granada’s wheels – you’re probably now expecting the build to have taken on more than the usual sleeper modifications.

I first saw this car featured in a forum a few years ago when it featured a 600-hp Ford Cosworth YB engine. Even that was a monstrous transplant, leaving a demon sleeper capable of embarrassing pretty much anything on the roads. 

I have so much respect for the owner and builder for what he did next I think I’d swoon if I met him. I know he is from Norway, and judging from his history with his beloved Ford Granada, he’s missing a few nuts and bolts upstairs. As if 600-hp wasn’t enough, he ripped the Cosworth engine out and installed (wait for it) a twin-turbocharged 4.7-L V8 built by Ford and re-engineered by Koenigsegg. Multiply its previous power output by nearly 3 and you are left with 1700-hp… Jesus H Christ.

Isn’t she a thing to behold, a wonderful experiment taken too far? Of course, all this ludicrous power is harnessed by a lot of other modifications – follow this thread for a detailed diary and pictures of the build.

What I admire most about this creation is the fact the owner knew exactly what his sleeper should be. The Granada isn’t the obvious choice as there’s the classic Escort and Sierra that are the usual Fords to take on the mods. It’s 80s, boxy and cool, and although it suggests a few extra hps, you’d never suspect a whopping 1700 of them.

I take my hat off to you, you mad Norwegian Doc Emmett Brown – you’ve created the world’s most terrifying sleeper.

If you agree and want to see more of this chap, check out his Facebook page and watch the monster come to life in the video below.

 

 

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Dorothy’s Datsun 120Y

The following video is taken from fullBOOST.com.au, a site that loves sleepers just as much as Gargling Gas… which it A LOT!

Dorothy’s Datsun 120Y is the wolf in sheep’s clothing, an unassuming grocery getter from which you’d expect to see the curls of a blue rinse perm sticking up over the seat. The license plate reads an apt: NAN747. What people don’t know is there’s a 30-year old unopened Nissan VG30 3.0L V6 engine inside. Not happy with the power, this old girl boosts the engine with a Holset turbocharger, and fuel comes from a Tunnel Vision straight LPG system and a Haltech ECU.

Check fullBOOST out and watch the funny video below. The music is perfect, setting the tone for what is ultimately a drag monster.

Not Quite A Sleeper Wagon But Still…

Here at Gargling Gas you’ll often find posts on wagons (estates) with either sleeper qualities or the X factor that pushes them from being a boring family-mobile into an uber cool ride.

The wagon pictured above looks like most wagons touched by the brand’s performance division. You know it probably has a V6 or V8 and is capable of producing 300+ bhp, however according to Brabus, this 850 6.0 Biturbo iBusiness is the “fastest and most powerful luxury sedan in the world”.

And I believe them because the stats are ludicrous, the sort of figures you’d expect to see on an F1 car.

Batman couldn’t handle this car but Darth Vader could… just. This Brabus 850 is based on the 2014 E63 AMG, with the Biturbo increasing the  5.5-L S-Model V8 to 5.9-L. This means you receive 850-bhp and a tarmac-creasing 1,069 ft-lbs of torque. All of this mechanical anger is transfered to the ground via a seven-speed AMG Speedshift transmission, and to prevent it from exploding, the torque has been electronically limited to 848 lb-ft. Not to worry though as 62-mph comes in 3.1 seconds – they’ll certainly be no “are we there yets” from the kids. Should you feel the need, you can also hit 217-mph – that’s faster than a lot of supercars!

So whilst all the badges, exhausts, rims, disks and callipers suggest performance, they don’t suggest 850-bhp. So I guess in some respects this is a sleeper of sorts… just on an entirely different level.

The Ultimate Ultimate Sleeper

It’s no secret I’m a huge fan of the Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing sleeper cars, and I’ve even written a short piece on how to create a sleeper car; however, after discovering this little gem, I realised I’d previously thrown the term ‘ultimate sleeper’ around a little too freely. As soon as I saw this neat little automotive package, I wanted and needed the ultimate piece of 80s lunacy in my life.

It’s the Nissan March SuperTurbo, a 930cc supercharged and turbocharged mini rocket. Over here in the UK you’ll recognise it as the Micra – same car just in Japan and Australia it was tagged as the March. There were other such sleeper cars made during this era, but none symbolised the granny run-around quite like the Micra – in fact, even today, if you spot a modern Micra (especially a gold one) you are almost guaranteed to find a silver top behind the wheel.

Why don’t manufactures make these quirky mad little pocket rockets anymore? I don’t mean the ubiquitous hot hatches we now see competing for highest BHP every time a new version of their fastest model is released – I’m talking about instead of increasing engine displacement, just supercharging AND turbocharging its tiny 930cc engine and creating a granny shopping cart capable of 60-mph in around 7.5 seconds – for its time, it could beat a Porsche 944 S to 60-mph and even out-drag it at the 1/4 mile.

I can imagine pulling up next to a Porsche in the 80s and looking across at its driver with his pinstripe shirt, red braces and house brick mobile phone. I’d rev and rattle the tiny 930cc engine of my Nissan Micra and inch forward. The yuppie would be so furious at my audacity he’d have to stop talking about stocks and shares and hang up his brick. After the lights had turned green and I’d just nosed ahead, I’d slow, indicate and casually turn off, leaving the yuppie so angry, he’d be scrambling for his Filofax to instruct his secretary, Sandra, to book him a massage session.

Despite being both super and turbo charged, it’s not a particularly complicated set-up.  At low-to-mid revs, the little four banger is boosted by a positive displacement blower, and then once nearing the higher revs (4500-rpm), a fairly large turbo kicks in to provide amazing top-end performance. This sounds a bit clunky but apparently the transition between both systems is very smooth thanks to a simple control system.