Wings, Box Flares & Lots Of Paint

Not only is the BMW pictured above a thing to behold, this 1976 3.0-L CSL boasts a splendid array of colours that somehow work and highlight the car’s features. Art purists will smirk at the idea of using a car as a canvas, but artist, Alexander Calder, known for surrealism, modern art, and his kinetic sculptures, represents his chosen genres well here.

 

1976 3.0-L CSL

1976 3.0-L CSL

The above image may not be to everyone’s taste, but take in the style and compare with the rather brilliant image below. I know which “canvas” I’d rather have presented/parked in my living room.

Calder isn’t the only artist to take inspiration from the Bavarian Motor Company. Everyone has heard of Andy Warhol, right? He’s the chap responsible for Pop Art – take in the piece below and you’ll immediately recognise the style.

So what does a modern (slightly mad) artist do when he takes hold of a 1979 BMW M1 and some brushes? Take a look below and marvel at the solid German engineering combined with the insanity of an artist let loose with his paint box.

The M1 was BMW’s supercar, a fact Warhol seemed to know when he went to work on it. What would look ghastly on a human, this mix of clashing colours just looks right on this boxy retro sports car.

I’m a big BMW fan and have owned a black E46 M3 and currently drive a black E36 325i coupe. I couldn’t do a Bimmer art post without including one of my favourite looking cars, the E30 M3. Not only is the E30 iconic, this collection of car art boasted a wonderful example of simplistic and solid German design painting by an artist known for his simplistic shapes and colours.

I’d never heard of Ken Done until I saw this collection featured on BMWism.com – click the link and check out the other BMWs and the varying styles lavished and embellished upon their boxy and retro bodies.

 

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Troy Paiva: Cars From The Dead

After downloading Stephen King’s Mile 81 novella onto my iPhone last night (I like to wait until the wife is asleep and read under the duvet)I couldn’t help but notice the eye-catching cover art. Intrigued, I tapped the artist’s name into my phone’s Notes feature and, oblivious of the amazing world that awaited me, I went to sleep.

The name I recalled from my phone the following day was Troy Paiva, and one search into Google images filled my screen, eyes, mind and soul with a barrage of stark and contrasting colours that accurately (and rather eerily) represented everything I feel about the automobile and the personalities they possess. As you may know, nothing excites Gargling Gas more than cars with attitude, machines possessing a sense there is something more than electrics and mechanics going on behind their headlights.

With a vision expressed through lighting and a penchant for exploring the abandoned and unknown at night, Troy Paiva manages to inject colour, life and drama into the ostensibly listless and dead.

Troy Paiva has been stalking the night for images since 1989. Whether it’s abandoned buildings or junkyards, or simply exploring places he considers the ruins of a “Lost America”, Paiva finds inspiration through his sense of isolation and loneliness.

Thinking of himself as more an “Urban Explorer” than an artist and photographer, Paiva has also penned books about his night-time experiments with loneliness and light. “I love the surreal feeling of wandering through an abandoned subdivision, alone, in the middle of nowhere, in the middle of the night. Your senses become heightened and you feel the weight of time.”

Personally I am extremely excited because, not only do I adore and need all of these photographs hanging in my home, but Paiva “gets” it, he understands how static objects (especially machines) set within bleak backgrounds can evoke feelings and tease the senses if viewed a certain way.

Take the guy above, for example – whilst some (my wife and mother-in-law included) may see it as a horror B-movie prop, Gargling Gas and the majority of our readers (I hope) see her as an orphan that first needs taming, naming and then given a home, a place where she’ll be cared for, restored, loved and cherished.

But then that could just be me…

If you want to see more of these stunning shots, check out Paiva’s galleries

And remember folks, Gargling Gas exists because cars have feelings too…

H.R. Giger Inspired Car Art

 

Yesterday I sadly learned the passing of the incredible and incomparable surrealist painter, sculptor and set designer, H.R. Giger. If you’ve seen the Alien movies you’ll have witnessed the mind of this Swiss genius. I’m not usually a Sci-Fi fan, but the horrors Giger introduced into the Alien movies pushed them heavily into the horror sub-genre – I’m a big fan of violence, blood and gore.

I was lucky enough to watch the first film at a friend’s house, aged 11. If I’m to be totally honest, I did scare me a little as the film set and Aliens were so startlingly real – this movie makes the CGI of today look silly and amateur.

A few years later at secondary school I was friends with a kid whose father earned a good living supplying the U.S. with his massive modern art canvases during the late 80s. This friend had a few H.R. Giger books in his room, and thumbing through them because of my love of horror, I realised this chap had a lot more going on in his head (pic above). Obviously, been a teenage male, this horror erotica stuck with me.

I was very sad to hear the great man had passed and it reminded me of the inspired car art pictured below. Further investigation led me to a whole load of Giger inspired automotive art, so seeing as this is a car site and I’m a big Giger fan, it’s totally fitting that I say R.I.P. and present some of the art inspired by the man now casting light somewhere dark, dank and brimmed with horror.

 

 

 

Fabien Oefner’s Disintegrating Cars

Ferrari 330 P4

Wow…

Not a particularly great line to open an article with but it was the first thing I uttered when I saw this genius’ art. The ‘wow’ quickly transformed into pure awe as I read how Oefner created his pieces – there’s no Photoshop going on here.

Jaguar E-Type

This dedicated and insanely patient artist takes hundreds of individual shots and pieces them together over a period of 2 months. Every car is totally dismantled and then photographed component by component in a specific position to create the illusion of an exploding car.

Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR Uhlenhaut Coupe

I have always been fascinated by the clean, crisp looks of 3D renderings. So I tried to use that certain type of aesthetic and combine it with the strength of real photography. These images are also about capturing time: either in stopping it as in the Hatch series or inventing it as in the Disintegrating series. – Fabien Oefner

 

Automotive Ink

They say beauty is only skin deep, and in most cases this is true. In this short piece I prove that beauty is not only skin deep, but in the cases below skin represents true love and passion.

I haven’t had any tattoos, but if I ever did it would no doubt be a car, probably a slammed 67 Caddy Deville. I know I would never regret it and 50 years down the line it would still hold true to my heart.

Check out these amazing automotive tattoos and comment on which is your favourite.

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So, what’s your favourite piece of art? Mine’s a toss up between the 68 Charger and the turbo skull.